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Types of Opal: video and pictures

 

How do you tell the different types of opal? In this video Justin will take you through the four main Australian opal types  – as well as a newly discovered one not yet gone mainstream.

Understanding opal starts with understanding the basic types of opal found.

Black Opal

Black opal is the most valuable type of opal and it is predominantly found in Lightning Ridge. It is called black opal due to the dark body tone of the gem. This dark body tone appears because the natural backing or tint of the stone is dark grey or black common potch (opal without colour).

With the potch on the underside the light travels into the stone but instead of passing through it bounces back at you – creating a super vibrant colour play.  The colours are usually fairly vivid and intense.

Black Opal: note how light cannot pass though the grey or black underlying potch.
Black Opal: note how light cannot pass though the grey or black underlying potch.

Crystal Opal

Crystal opals are a more widely found across the various Australian opal fields. Crystal opals are characterised by their transparency. If you hold a crystal opal up to the light you will see that the light passes through the stone. In the video Justin shows us a beautiful crystal that displays a depth of colour which – because of the transparency – gives the gem a unique three dimensional quality. You can see the  blocks of colour and patterns in the different levels of the opal.  This phenomena is rarely found in other types of opal.

Crystal Opal held up to the light
Crystal Opal held up to the light

 

White Opal

The most common of all the opals and the one people around the world are familiar with. White opal is  found in Australia around Coober Pedy but was also found in the ancient mines of Slovakia and Hungary. It has a characteristic milky appearance and is translucent rather than transparent like crystal opal. Light can pass though but only diffused. White opals tend to exhibit more pastel colours rather than the fully saturated ones found in crystal or black opal.

White opal held up to the light showing translucency
White opal held up to the light showing translucency

 

Boulder Opal

Boulder opal is mainly found in the North Eastern part of Australia in the state of Queensland. The opal is found in a host rock called ironstone. As the name suggests it is much harder to mine and finds are not immediately obvious since the opal usually appears in thin seams. However, once the seams are identified and cut into large chunks, opal miners then find the fault line and “split” the rock – revealing the beautiful opal faces. This host ironstone rock can range in colour from light brown to a deep brown.

Boulder Opal pieces split from the same vein
Boulder Opal pieces split from the same vein

Australis Fire Opal

Currently found in the outback Western Australia this orange to yellow opal is so new it only has a marketing name! Unlike the other opals found in Australia it is a volcanic type of opal – similar to Mexican Fire Opal. At this stage nothing has been found with a play of colour but as it is faceted the light bounces beautifully around the gem. As we know more about this stone we will keep you updated.

Australis Fire Opal
Australis Fire Opal

 

 

 

 

  • Mike Medvec USA

    This was a very interesting video and it helped me to look for the differences. Thank you Justin

    • Blackopaldirect

      You are welcome Mike I am glad it helped 🙂

  • Danny Wiley

    Thanks Justin for another fantastic video. I have always learned so much from you about opals. I have been working a lot lately with boulder opal. It can be very messy, but the end result can be worth it. Thanks for showing the new find. Quite interesting.

    • Blackopaldirect

      You are welcome Danny Yes boulder opal is very messy and get everywhere in your machine and on your clothes.

  • Danielle Christy

    Whatsbthe type n price

    • Ruth BT

      Hi Danielle, This isn’t opal at all. It may be synthetic or a type of shell. Sorry I can’t be of much more help.

    • Blackopaldirect

      Yes that is mother of pearl or a synthetic as Ruth just mentioned. Def not opal sorry

  • jacruick

    You have me hooked on opals … I was interested in a ring but found out they were doublet opals … So are they like ‘fake’ opals ?

    • Blackopaldirect

      HI Jack Doublets are more like this in the picture They are opal but enhanced by putting a black back on a lighter or clearer opal to look like a black opal. So it is really considered a treated opal.

      • jacruick

        Oh thank you! So what is a triplet? And what is the diff between a fire opal and a black opal ?

        • Blackopaldirect

          This is what am opal triplet is 🙂

  • Minhaj Mansoor

    Awesome video. Justin you are good teacher mate. Good on you mate…✌🏿️

    • Blackopaldirect

      Thanks mate I am glad I can help

  • Thomas Qing Sheng

    Yowah Nut Opals look really cool. I’m guessing they’re not worth much though..?

    • Blackopaldirect

      Yes I didn’t add the Yowah nut. Good spotting 🙂